Sobering Insight

Three years ago today, I wrote a post called Satan’s Favorite Drug Ever – Meth. Each year WordPress gives me a little run-down about how my most popular post ever is doing. Maybe this is okay for some kinds of posts, but each year, when I get the notification congratulating me on having such a landmark post, I feel sad. The numbers of people looking for help because of meth are staggering when you take into consideration, I’m no big deal on the subject. My blog doesn’t rank in the top 2 or 3 pages of Google results, nor have I dedicated this space to talk about drugs in any depth at all. And yet, people write me all the time about losing someone, (or themselves), to this drug.

This year was particularly sobering. Here is a snapshot of the dramatic incline in the number of people who have visited this horrific description of just how my marriage was destroyed:

SFDE Insights

Sadly, we still have the rest of November and all of December to go.

If this post is any indicator, we as a country are spiraling into a chemical abyss.

Not a day goes by that I don’t miss Chef, the way he used to be. I miss how he used to talk, smile, laugh… Even since he became sober again, he never has looked the same to me. Things are different — how he looks physically; how he speaks; what he cares about now. This drug truly is a game-changer.

Every writer hopes they get to write something people will care about. I’m just kind of sad that this kind of thing was my contribution.

~ Bird

Now I Love With A Limp

Losing Him

Loving With A Limp

ehasThe internet is over-flowing with stories of heartbreak and loss, and mine is not all that different. Pain is pain, and despite everything that is said or done, pain hurts equally. I’ve read some stories that left me wondering how these poor people were able to ever recover from the wounds, while others’ seemed like the hurt was far more extensive than the circumstances warranted. That’s the thing about being humans. We interpret life from different perspectives, and a patchwork of things contribute to every single thing we have, or ever will, experience. But we all understand pain, and what hurts, hurts. It is one of the truly few things we all understand pretty much the same.

In October 2011, I had been happily married for almost 20 years to a man who had come along and eased some of the wounds I had suffered from an abused childhood. It…

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